Lexicon of Terms related to the Integrated Palliative Approach to Care

A
C
E
F
G
H
I
O
P
Q
R
S
V

Like all health care practices, hospice palliative care has its own language and terminology. This lexicon of terms is designed to help those interested in implementing the integrated palliative approach to care develop a common language and understanding.

Click here for a PDF version.


For citation: Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association, Lexicon, The Way Forward Initiative: An Integrated Palliative Approach to care, 2014.

Advance Care Planning

A process people can use to: think about their values and what is important to them with regard to their health care choices; explore medical information that is relevant to their health; communicate their wishes and values to their loved ones, substitute decision-maker and health care team; and record their health care choices and decisions in the event they can no longer speak for themselves. The process may involve discussions with their health care providers and people who are significant in their lives. Advance care planning may result in the creation of an advance directive or “living will”, which is a person’s formal or informal instructions about their future care and choice of treatment options.


Aging

Aging is a natural process that happens to all living things. In people, the process of aging has an effect on the body and mind, and can affect health and quality of life. For example, as people age, their hearts become slower, their blood vessels and arteries become stiffer, their bones shrink in size and are more likely to break, their muscles lose strength, they may become less coordinated or have trouble balancing, and their memory becomes less efficient. The changes that occur with aging affect quality of life and increase the risk of dying. See “Frailty”.

 


Autonomy

Aging is a natural process that happens to all living things. In people, the process of aging has an effect on the body and mind, and can affect health and quality of life. For example, as people age, their hearts become slower, their blood vessels and arteries become stiffer, their bones shrink in size and are more likely to break, their muscles lose strength, they may become less coordinated or have trouble balancing, and their memory becomes less efficient. The changes that occur with aging affect quality of life and increase the risk of dying. See “Frailty”.